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PERFECT BOV DIESEL 4X4 10,350 ORIGINAL MILES
#1
WELLLLLLLL...... wouldn't you know it? back for sale again. PICS ARE ON PREVIOUS FOR SALE THREAD

PRICE REDUCED!!! CAN ACCEPT ALL FORMS OF PAYMENT INCLUDING CREDIT CARDS 1

Chevy pickup diesel military 10,348 mi. 1987.5 M1028 shelter carrier - $5000 (MOUNT AIRY-LISBON)
Date: 2012-05-04, 3:36PM EDT
Reply to: qvv2f-2988982008@sale.craigslist.org
cell: 301-524-6144 anytime

This truck is a real mechanical Gem. My wife doesn't want me to get rid of it but we just bought a bus and etc, etc...

This truck is from Army Materiel Command in Northern Virginia. It was kept indoors in a hangar and was absolutely free of any rust when I got it in 2007 with about 6800 real miles on it. The interior was beautiful and had great vinyl, a little more wear now but it is still very nice. Everything on this is original except for the batteries. I have commercial batteries in it at the moment. The charging system was gone over by vehicle electrical specialists, great bill of health. I have had Fitzgerald Chevrolet in Frederick go over every detail of this vehicle and also adjust the alignment. They offered to buy it from me at the time (guy doesn't work there anymore). The service manager told me it was the best preserved low mileage truck he had ever seen back in '07 and we kept it as a bug out vehicle. It has been dealer serviced since. I have driven this about 500 miles a year or less, it now has 10, 348 miles. It fires up beautifully first light crank, no smoke and runs awesome. The 6.2 liter diesel is a Detroit (fantastic, not crappy revamp) and the automatic trans is a th400. The truck is truly unique it has a 200 amp breaker on the dash to control the wiring for the peripherals. There is wiring for a shelter or trailer at 200 amps of 24V power neatly housed in a cool little compartment in the front of the bed. Also, there is an air conditioner compressor under the hood that is in place from the factory and ready to be plumbed to the dash. I was very excited about this when I bought it. I would love to see this become someone's beloved collectible but don't be fooled because this truck can be a well behaved daily driver and is very happy on the road at highway speeds (no b.s.). It is very comfortable and the ride is not harsh. The bushings are all still in great shape. I have driven it to Aberdeen and back many times while at 55-70, it's not like any of the others I have owned. It may be because this truck is part M1010 and part M1028. It is badged as a M1028. The dash pad should be replaced for this to be excellent in the interior. I have not done that since it is so close to being air conditioned I wasn't sure if I wanted to alter it. Easy enough fix though, 20 minutes? or so. I have the replacement. I have 6000 in it and the S-250 shelter can be purchased for 500-1000 depending on what you want from inside of it. These have sold for as much as 7500 to 9000 all over the internet. Many have sold for a little less that were not turn key and not mechanically flawless as mine. The price is great and I am willing to take a non refundable deposit and a check or credit card for the difference if the terms are agreeable. I have the title and the original Army plates that were on this truck when I got it.
I will attach the specs as follows:
This M1028 has been equipped with heavy-duty electrical systems that incorporate the M1010 200 amp/24v electrical system and air conditioner fixtures. These M1028s have not been provided with a different designation.
General Motors
The GM CUCVs were produced in the 1983-86 time period (model years were 1984-87 and mostly 1984) and were powered by 6.2L Detroit Diesel V8 engine. The GM CUCVs were assembled mostly from the heaviest duty bits and pieces from the light commercial truck lines. The CUCVs came in three basic body styles, a pickup, a utility and an ambulance body. A chassis cab fitted with a service body could be called a fourth. The M1008 was the basic cargo truck, the M1010 was the ambulance and the M1009 3/4 ton utility rig, which was a stripped Blazer uprated to 3/4-ton capacity. With the exception of the M1009, the trucks were all rated as 1-1/4 ton (commonly called a "five-quarter"), even though some of them had payloads in excess of that. In the truck lines there were some heavy duty variants, to include the M1028 shelter carriers, the shelter being a mobile command, communications or intelligence operations enclosure. The M1031 was the chassis cab which was most commonly found in the two door version. These latter trucks were all rated for heavier 3,600 or 3,900 pound loads, vs. the M1008s 2,900 pound load capacity.
Powertrain
All the CUCVs were powered by GM's 6.2L J-series Detroit Diesel V8 engine non-emissions diesel. These were rated at 155 hp (116 kW) and 240 lb·ft (325 N·m), which was 5 hp (3.7 kW) more than the emissions diesel engine of the time. They were all equipped with the TH-400 automatic. All but the M1028A1 and M1031 used the NP-208 chain drive transfer case. The M1028A1 and M1031 units had a slip-yoke rear output version of the NP-205, which was specified mainly for its PTO capacity.
Axles
The M1008 trucks used open Dana 60 front axles, with the M1028 and M1031 variations often having a Trac-Lok limited slip. In the rear, the M1008s used the GM 10.5-inch (270 mm) 10.5" Corporate 14 Bolt Differential with No-Spin lockers (the commercial trade name for the Detroit Locker). Though the M1028A2 and A3 duallies have Dana 70 HD axles. Axle gear ratios were 4.56:1.
Electrical
As with other military vehicles, the CUCVs used a 24-volt electrical system. It was actually a hybrid 12/24-volt system that used 24-volts under the hood, complete with dual 100 amp alternators, the mandatory NATO slave receptacle for jump starting any NATO vehicle, and hookups for military radios. The rest of the truck was 12-volt.
GM Defense
The GM CUCV may not have made the grade as a battlefield vehicle, but it served well enough in its original role as a dollar-saving bridge between out-and-out tactical vehicles and off-the-shelf civilian vehicles. Like the rear echelon human troops, they provide support for the frontline forces. CUCVs of all generations are still in US service, though there are also many that have passed through military surplus sales into civilian ownership. In US military service, CUCVs have been removed from MTOE-based organizations in the Army and Marines, but are still in use as base / garrison support vehicles for organizations like Range Control, Base Facilities and Engineering, and other TDA[?] uses.
CUCV Specifications
Model years: '84-'87 GM M1008 CUCV

Engine: 379ci (6.2L) Detroit Diesel V8 engine
Power: 155 hp (116 kW) @ 3600 rpm
Torque: 257 lb·ft (348 N·m) @ 2000 rpm
Compression Ratio: 21:1
Transmission: THM400, 3-speed automatic
Transfer Case: NP-208 (unsynchronized)
NP-205 Used in trucks requiring PTO
Front Axle: Dana 60
Most were open except M1028's which feature Spicer Trak-lock (limited slip)
Rear Axle: 10.5" Corporate 14 Bolt Differential, with a Detroit Locker
Dana 70 used in trucks with dual rear wheel modification.
Axle Ratio: 4.56:1
Wheelbase: 131.5 inches
GVW: 8,800 pounds
Curb: Weight: 5,900 pounds
Tires: 235/85R-16E
Fuel Capacity: 20 gallons
Fording Depth: 20 inches
Approach/Angle: 42 degrees


Be wise, for it is far better to ensure success than to hope for it. ~ Me
Reply
#2
(05-04-2012, 05:57 PM)On Target Wrote: WELLLLLLLL...... wouldn't you know it? back for sale again. PICS ARE ON PREVIOUS FOR SALE THREAD

PRICE REDUCED!!! CAN ACCEPT ALL FORMS OF PAYMENT INCLUDING CREDIT CARDS 1

Chevy pickup diesel military 10,348 mi. 1987.5 M1028 shelter carrier - $5000 (MOUNT AIRY-LISBON)
Date: 2012-05-04, 3:36PM EDT
Reply to: qvv2f-2988982008@sale.craigslist.org
cell: 301-524-6144 anytime

This truck is a real mechanical Gem. My wife doesn't want me to get rid of it but we just bought a bus and etc, etc...

This truck is from Army Materiel Command in Northern Virginia. It was kept indoors in a hangar and was absolutely free of any rust when I got it in 2007 with about 6800 real miles on it. The interior was beautiful and had great vinyl, a little more wear now but it is still very nice. Everything on this is original except for the batteries. I have commercial batteries in it at the moment. The charging system was gone over by vehicle electrical specialists, great bill of health. I have had Fitzgerald Chevrolet in Frederick go over every detail of this vehicle and also adjust the alignment. They offered to buy it from me at the time (guy doesn't work there anymore). The service manager told me it was the best preserved low mileage truck he had ever seen back in '07 and we kept it as a bug out vehicle. It has been dealer serviced since. I have driven this about 500 miles a year or less, it now has 10, 348 miles. It fires up beautifully first light crank, no smoke and runs awesome. The 6.2 liter diesel is a Detroit (fantastic, not crappy revamp) and the automatic trans is a th400. The truck is truly unique it has a 200 amp breaker on the dash to control the wiring for the peripherals. There is wiring for a shelter or trailer at 200 amps of 24V power neatly housed in a cool little compartment in the front of the bed. Also, there is an air conditioner compressor under the hood that is in place from the factory and ready to be plumbed to the dash. I was very excited about this when I bought it. I would love to see this become someone's beloved collectible but don't be fooled because this truck can be a well behaved daily driver and is very happy on the road at highway speeds (no b.s.). It is very comfortable and the ride is not harsh. The bushings are all still in great shape. I have driven it to Aberdeen and back many times while at 55-70, it's not like any of the others I have owned. It may be because this truck is part M1010 and part M1028. It is badged as a M1028. The dash pad should be replaced for this to be excellent in the interior. I have not done that since it is so close to being air conditioned I wasn't sure if I wanted to alter it. Easy enough fix though, 20 minutes? or so. I have the replacement. I have 6000 in it and the S-250 shelter can be purchased for 500-1000 depending on what you want from inside of it. These have sold for as much as 7500 to 9000 all over the internet. Many have sold for a little less that were not turn key and not mechanically flawless as mine. The price is great and I am willing to take a non refundable deposit and a check or credit card for the difference if the terms are agreeable. I have the title and the original Army plates that were on this truck when I got it.
I will attach the specs as follows:
This M1028 has been equipped with heavy-duty electrical systems that incorporate the M1010 200 amp/24v electrical system and air conditioner fixtures. These M1028s have not been provided with a different designation.
General Motors
The GM CUCVs were produced in the 1983-86 time period (model years were 1984-87 and mostly 1984) and were powered by 6.2L Detroit Diesel V8 engine. The GM CUCVs were assembled mostly from the heaviest duty bits and pieces from the light commercial truck lines. The CUCVs came in three basic body styles, a pickup, a utility and an ambulance body. A chassis cab fitted with a service body could be called a fourth. The M1008 was the basic cargo truck, the M1010 was the ambulance and the M1009 3/4 ton utility rig, which was a stripped Blazer uprated to 3/4-ton capacity. With the exception of the M1009, the trucks were all rated as 1-1/4 ton (commonly called a "five-quarter"), even though some of them had payloads in excess of that. In the truck lines there were some heavy duty variants, to include the M1028 shelter carriers, the shelter being a mobile command, communications or intelligence operations enclosure. The M1031 was the chassis cab which was most commonly found in the two door version. These latter trucks were all rated for heavier 3,600 or 3,900 pound loads, vs. the M1008s 2,900 pound load capacity.
Powertrain
All the CUCVs were powered by GM's 6.2L J-series Detroit Diesel V8 engine non-emissions diesel. These were rated at 155 hp (116 kW) and 240 lb·ft (325 N·m), which was 5 hp (3.7 kW) more than the emissions diesel engine of the time. They were all equipped with the TH-400 automatic. All but the M1028A1 and M1031 used the NP-208 chain drive transfer case. The M1028A1 and M1031 units had a slip-yoke rear output version of the NP-205, which was specified mainly for its PTO capacity.
Axles
The M1008 trucks used open Dana 60 front axles, with the M1028 and M1031 variations often having a Trac-Lok limited slip. In the rear, the M1008s used the GM 10.5-inch (270 mm) 10.5" Corporate 14 Bolt Differential with No-Spin lockers (the commercial trade name for the Detroit Locker). Though the M1028A2 and A3 duallies have Dana 70 HD axles. Axle gear ratios were 4.56:1.
Electrical
As with other military vehicles, the CUCVs used a 24-volt electrical system. It was actually a hybrid 12/24-volt system that used 24-volts under the hood, complete with dual 100 amp alternators, the mandatory NATO slave receptacle for jump starting any NATO vehicle, and hookups for military radios. The rest of the truck was 12-volt.
GM Defense
The GM CUCV may not have made the grade as a battlefield vehicle, but it served well enough in its original role as a dollar-saving bridge between out-and-out tactical vehicles and off-the-shelf civilian vehicles. Like the rear echelon human troops, they provide support for the frontline forces. CUCVs of all generations are still in US service, though there are also many that have passed through military surplus sales into civilian ownership. In US military service, CUCVs have been removed from MTOE-based organizations in the Army and Marines, but are still in use as base / garrison support vehicles for organizations like Range Control, Base Facilities and Engineering, and other TDA[?] uses.
CUCV Specifications
Model years: '84-'87 GM M1008 CUCV

Engine: 379ci (6.2L) Detroit Diesel V8 engine
Power: 155 hp (116 kW) @ 3600 rpm
Torque: 257 lb·ft (348 N·m) @ 2000 rpm
Compression Ratio: 21:1
Transmission: THM400, 3-speed automatic
Transfer Case: NP-208 (unsynchronized)
NP-205 Used in trucks requiring PTO
Front Axle: Dana 60
Most were open except M1028's which feature Spicer Trak-lock (limited slip)
Rear Axle: 10.5" Corporate 14 Bolt Differential, with a Detroit Locker
Dana 70 used in trucks with dual rear wheel modification.
Axle Ratio: 4.56:1
Wheelbase: 131.5 inches
GVW: 8,800 pounds
Curb: Weight: 5,900 pounds
Tires: 235/85R-16E
Fuel Capacity: 20 gallons
Fording Depth: 20 inches
Approach/Angle: 42 degrees

can't find the pics!
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#3
http://mdpreparedness.com/forum/showthre...941&page=3
NW Quad #1
"You cannot conquer an idea with an army." Thomas Paine


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#4
Hey On Target, I've tried emailing through the forum and left a message on your cell phone but have not received a response. Can you please contact me at deb1241321 (at) me.com? I'd like to come take a look at the truck tomorrow (Friday) evening.

Thanks.
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#5
(05-10-2012, 06:41 PM)cdb Wrote: Hey On Target, I've tried emailing through the forum and left a message on your cell phone but have not received a response. Can you please contact me at deb1241321 (at) me.com? I'd like to come take a look at the truck tomorrow (Friday) evening.

Thanks.

Hi, back on deck now. Sorry for the delay. I'll pm you now. Thanks for the follow through.1
Be wise, for it is far better to ensure success than to hope for it. ~ Me
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#6
Sad 
SOLD


Well, I was all loaded up and ready to go to the annual camp and the collector from Tennessee driving out to pick up the truck calls me, around the time he was supposed to show up, and says his phone went blank and he hadn't left yet. "Don't worry I'm still comin'" he says. "We'll meet you in the morning I promise I definitely still want it." Thursday shot in the ass! Friday morning turns in to Friday afternoon and he calls his wife on the scene after 12 hours of driving and tells her there's no air conditioning in the truck. Next thing I know he slips me 1000 dollars and apologizes for wasting my time and away he went to visit the battlefields in the area. Totally confused I went home to list the truck back on this site and also Craigslist and got ready to leave. I ate dinner and loaded up the coolers when my phone exploded. I had 7 text messages and 4 phone calls. I called the first voicemail back and he pleaded with me to give him first crack and that he could be here in a couple hours or first thing in the morning with cash after the bank opened. Friday shot in the ass! Saturday @ 0930 hours they show up and we had an excellent time talking and getting to know each other. They are a Maryland prepper family and strangely also from Tennessee. Well the time got away from us and before we knew it the time was 12 o'clock and we still hadn't closed the deal. So, we shook it off and got back on track and they decided that they were gonna pass on the shelter since he has a r/v camoer for the back of a pickup truck. So now he has the coolest bug out vehicle in Maryland...maybe 1 so I get to the shop and my neighbor who is a commercial vehicle repair shop that had offered to do a quick snatch with their lift calls in stupid and doesn't show up while we're sitting there with our thumbs in our posteriors. Screw it, waited too long. Tried to fire up my forklift but it was plugged in wrong and had turned into a giant paperweight. We used ratchet straps to manualy adjust the forklift. No fun! I was embarassed but they couldn't have been cooler. Well, now it's about 4 o'clock or so and we're strapped down and they drove me back to my bus where the truck was originaly parked (park and ride, opsec, you know how it is.) By the time I got back to the house and ate I realized that... Saturday shot in the ass! Anyway, I had to make a Faustian deal with my daughter who was riding shotgun to make up the trip since she was so excited to go camping for the first time. I called my mother and picked her up in the bus with the whole family and we drove to Randalstown on route 26 to get crabs. 2 dozen females for 20
Anyhow, we ended up having a great time but there was no chance that I had enough personality to make friends in the woods by the end of that day. We left Sunday to drive to Carlisle to meet a friend that wants a M1009 from me and pick up some money to get started on it for him. Excellent Sunday, turns out his kids were really cool, both just returned from combat deployments. My daughter has an allergic reaction to the dogs he has and now Sunday and Monday shot in the ass! Been gone since Tuesday and had a great time at Rambling Pines. We collected most of the meals we ate out of the natural setting there and I have never seen so many blegill and sunfish in a single area. So now I'm screwed because my kid thinks fishing is drop a line in and lift out your fish...I haven't broken the news yet. The pricing for the place is a little salty but I had all of the features and comforts available if the wagon went off of the wheels. You never know with the younglings some times. Anyway, great little place if you're into clean and secure and all of that kind of wierd stuff. Looking forward to another chance to meet up. Anyhow, glad everyone that went up to Green Ridge had a great time.
Be wise, for it is far better to ensure success than to hope for it. ~ Me
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#7
So basically .... this wont be any improvement to performance ???


I thought diesel turbos would build more pressure and boost as compared to petrol turbos, So would it not help in reducing the spool up time if there was a pressure release ?

Most diesel performance shops whoz websites Ive visited do sell diesel BOVs and this is what they claim ---> This device has to be connected not only to the turbo boost pipe with the correct dimensions, but also to the Throttle control that goes to the ECU. That solenoid connector electrically realises that the throttle is cut off and so it releases the pressure from turbo and hence keeps the turbo fans spinning, so when u throttle again, your turbo spooling is reduced (in some cases) by almost 700 rpm.. Atleast thats what I understood from what that guy told me.

And he said that the pressure release would be more when you are shifting at close to 3500 - 4000 rpm from 1st to 2nd or from 2nd - 3rd ..... basically as revs increase and so I assume that the sound wont increase if it were just a vocal chord !!!
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